Standards and Ethics


Regarding Dogs

  • An Assistance Dog must be temperamentally screened for emotional soundness and working ability.
  • An Assistance Dog must be physically screened for the highest degree of good health and physical soundness.
  • An Assistance Dog must be technically and analytically trained for maximum control and for the specialized tasks he/she is asked to perform.
  • An Assistance Dog must be trained using humane training methods providing for the physical and emotional safety of the dog.
  • An Assistance Dog must be permitted to learn at his/her own individual pace and not be placed in service before reaching adequate physical and emotional maturity.
  • An Assistance Dog must be matched to best suit the client's needs, abilities and lifestyle.
  • An Assistance Dog must be placed with a client able to interact with him/her.
  • An Assistance Dog must be placed with a client able to provide for the dog's emotional, physical and financial needs.
  • An Assistance Dog must be placed with a client able to provide a stable and secure living environment.
  • An Assistance Dog must be placed with a client who expresses a desire for increased independence and/or an improvement in the quality of his/her life through the use of an Assistance Dog.
  • Project Chance will have the first right of refusal  to accept responsibility for the dog in the event of a graduate's death or incapacity to provide proper care.
  • Project Chance will not train, place, or certify dogs with any aggressive behavior. An assistance dog may not be trained in any way for guard or protection duty. Non-aggressive barking as a trained behavior will be acceptable in appropriate situations.


Regarding Clients

  • Clients have a right to be considered to receive an Assistance Dog regardless of race, sex, religion or creed.
  • Clients have the right to be treated with respect and dignity at all times in their dealings with the member organization's personnel and representatives.
  • The client has a right to receive a sound educational program to learn how to use his or her Assistance Dog most effectively at home and/or in public.
  • The client has a right to receive appropriate education on his or her role as a user of an Assistance Dog in the community.
  • The client has the right to receive regularly scheduled team evaluation and follow-up support.
  • The client has a right to receive information on or ask for assistance in the following matters:
    • Additional training for the dog that is needed due to a change in the client's functional level.
    • A behavioral management problem with the dog.
    • A major veterinary problem.
    • Legal problems pertaining to the use and access of the Assistance Dog as allowed by law.
  • The client has the right to expect that personal files will remain confidential and will not be disclosed unless he or she has given express prior permission.
  • The community has a right to expect an Assistance Dog to be under control at all times and to exhibit no intrusive behavior in public, therefore the client has the right be partnered with an appropriate dog and taught appropriate handling techniques.
  • The community has a right to receive information concerning Project Chance Program Standards and Ethics.
  • The community has a right to receive education on the benefits received by a person with a disability through the use of an Assistance Dog.
  • No client shall be required to participate in fund raising or public relations activities without their expressed and voluntary permission.

Assistance Dogs in Public

  • Public appropriateness
    • Dog is clean, well-groomed and does not have an offensive odor.
    • Dog does not urinate or defecate in inappropriate locations.
  • Behavior
    • Dog does not solicit attention, visit or annoy any member of the general public.
    • Dog does not disrupt the normal course of business.
    • Dog does not vocalize unnecessarily, i.e. barking, growling or whining.
    • Dog shows no aggression towards people or other animals.
    • Dog does not solicit or steal food or other items from the general public.
  • Training
    • Dog is specifically trained to perform 3 or more tasks to mitigate aspects of the client's disability.
    • Dog works calmly and quietly on harness, leash or other tether.
    • Dog is able to perform its tasks in public.
    • Dog must be able to lie quietly beside the handler without blocking aisles, doorways, etc.
    • Dog is trained to urinate and defecate on command.
    • Dog stays within 24" of its handler at all times unless the nature of a trained task requires it to be working at a greater distance.

 

 

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